It was common for pioneers to carve their names into the base of the rock, but these names have since eroded away. Courthouse and Jail Rocks are two of the most famous landmarks of westward migration. The hardness of the upper section is the reason the rock has not eroded away more. The voyagers have called it the Courthouse; but it looks infinitely more like the Capitol."[4]. Courthouse and Jail Rocks, which rise 400 feet (121 m) above the North Platte Valley, are composed of Brule clay, Gering sandstone and volcanic ash. Court House and Jail House Rocks are remnants of an ancient plateau, that was split by the North Platte River. The Great Platte River Road. Robert Stuart (explorer) first recorded Court House and Jail House Rock in 1812. The buttes are the first promontories along the trail coming from the east. Pumpkin Creek forms an oxbow near the buttes where a meadow with trees make an suitable campsite. Courthouse and Jail Rocks, rising some 400 feet above the North Platte Valley, are erosional remnants composed of clay, sandstone and volcanic ash. The name Court House and Jail House became the most common. Diary entries, now over 170 years old, explain a strong fascination with these scenic wonders. One of the important milestones on their journey, these rock formations are one of a half dozen landmarks found on the Overland Trail on the way to the West. The rock is 400 feet above the Platte River Valley and consists mainly of two different types of sandstone. The rocks are listed in the National Register of Historic Places and in the Nebraska Natural Areas Register. From North Platte to Fort Kearney the Pony Express Trail followed the south side of the Platte River. . Even though they are not technically mountains, these features were called mountains by the pioneers and weighed heavily on their memories because they were the first large geological features on the trail. Nearby passed the Oregon-California Trail, the Mormon Trail, the Pony Express Trail and the Sidney-Deadwood Trail. Courthouse and Jailhouse Rock. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, p. 348, Mattes, M.J. 1987. Jail Rock was never called Jail Rock by migrants; it was just called the Jail or Jail House. Rising almost 400 feet from the valley floor, and shrinking with every thunderstorm and strong windstorm, these rock formations are listed in the National Register of Historic Places. [5] Courthouse and Jail Rocks, which rise 400 feet (121 m) above the North Platte Valley, are composed of Brule clay, Gering sandstone and volcanic ash. One 1845 traveler described the rock as "resembling the ruins of an old castle [which] rises abruptly from the plain. [3] In 1845, one traveler described the rock as "resembling the ruins of an old castle [which] rises abruptly from the plain....It is difficult to look upon it and not believe that art had something to do with its construction. There is evidence that fur trappers, Indians, gold seekers on their way to California and the Black Hills, and the military once camped in this bend. The Great Platte River Road. All courthouse and jail rocks photographs ship within 48 hours and include a 30-day money-back guarantee. Courthouse and Jail Rocks are two of the most famous landmarks of westward migration. The rocks are listed in the National Register of Historic Places and in the Nebraska Natural Areas Register. Lincoln: Nebraska State Historical Society, 1969. Even for those emigrants who used the Julesburg, Colorado crossing of the South Platte River, the buttes are mentioned in their diaries.[5]. Hundreds of overland emigrants mentioned Courthouse Rock in their diaries. The rocks are listed in the National Register of Historic Places and in the Nebraska Natural Areas Register. See Nebraska Historical Marker Program for more information. The rocks were vanguards of unforgettable scenic wonders that travelers would encounter farther west, including Chimney Rock's curious spire and the rugged heights of Scott's Bluffs. For a brief moment in American history Jail Rock and companion Courthouse Rock appeared in hundreds of pioneer journals during the mid 19th century. Courthouse and Jail Rocks, which rise 400 feet (121 m) above the North Platte Valley, are composed of Brule clay, Gering sandstone and volcanic ash. Located in the Platte River valley, Courthouse Rock and its smaller companion, Jailhouse Rock, were among the first landmarks seen by pioneers heading west. Lying in the shadows of Court House and Jail Rock, this course features two long par 5's. (A historical marker located near Bridgeport in Morrill County, Nebraska.) Mattes, Merrill J. Slightly to the east of Court House Rock is another rock of equal height but smaller size called Jail Rock. Knowing they would never see these sights again, pioneers left the wagon trains and walked five to six miles to climb the rocks and carve their names into these Nebraska landmarks. Later, the railroads and major highways chose the north side of the river. Courthouse and Jail Rocks are two of the most famous landmarks of westward migration. Nearby passed the Oregon-California Trail, the Mormon Trail, the Pony Express Trail, and the Sidney-Deadwood Trail. Some pioneers called it a clerk’s office, county building, lighthouse, sentinel post or even “the leaning Tower of Pisa.”. The rock formations are listed in the National Register of Historic Places and in the Nebraska Natural Areas Register. Courthouse and Jail Rocks are two rock formations located near Bridgeport in the Nebraska Panhandle. The bottom part is much less stable. .It is difficult to look upon it and not believe that art had something to do with its construction. The rock formations are listed in the National Register of Historic Places and in the Nebraska Natural Areas Register. Its ridge top tee overlooks a bubbling creek through a tree framed opening to the fairway below. Dismal River Culture sites have been found throughout western Nebraska, helping archeologists document American Indian movement into western Nebraska during the1600s. While Court House Rock became the standard name for the feature, several other names were popular during the Great Migration: Solitary Tower, the Church, the Capitol, and the Castle. Many travelers would stray as much as five miles (8 km) from the Oregon Trail just to get a glimpse of the rocks. Emigrants leaving St. Louis, and receiving only a weak introduction to the trip to California or the Oregon Territory, were quite impressed with the string of scenic wonders on the way. The pair of rock formations served as a landmark along the trails for many pioneers traveling west in the 19th century. Choose your favorite courthouse and jail rocks photographs from millions of available designs. At an elevation of 4,050 feet (1,230 m) above sea level they rise 240 feet (73 m) above Pumpkin Creek. The voyagers have called it the Courthouse; but it looks infinitely more like the Capitol." One of the important milestones on their journey, these rock formations are one of a half dozen landmarks found on the Overland Trail on the way to the West. This page was last modified on 12 September 2017, at 12:22. . Nearby passed the Oregon-California Trail, the Mormon Trail, the Pony Express Trail and the Sidney-Deadwood Trail. Courthouse and Jail Rocks, rising some 400 feet above the North Platte Valley, are erosional remnants composed of clay, sandstone and volcanic ash. The voyagers have called it the Courthouse; but it looks infinitely more like the Capitol." [5] The rocks were vanguards of unforgettable scenic wonders that travelers would encounter farther west, including Chimney Rock's curious spire and the rugged heights of Scott's Bluffs. They are remnants of the nearby hills that have become separated over time. [5] Preliminary report on the geology and water resources of Nebraska west of the, Mattes, M.J. 1987. Nearby passed the Oregon-California Trail, the Mormon Trail, the Pony Express Trail and the Sidney-Deadwood Trail. Named after the courthouse in Saint Louis, the rocks were often mentioned in contemporary accounts. Court House Rock is a geological feature in the Nebraska Panhandle that became a famous landmark in the Platte River Road. The base is made of softer Brule Clay, and the top is composed of Arikaree sandstone mixed with limestone. [5] The Pony Express and the military used a shorter route on the west side as did the Sidney-Black Hills Trail. By 1849 and the California Gold Rush, the promontories had been described as Castles, a Church, and Coffins. The name "Courthouse" was first used in 1837. Courthouse and Jail Rocks, Bridgeport: Address, Courthouse and Jail Rocks Reviews: 4/5 Courthouse and Jail Rocks are two of the most famous landmarks of westward migration. The rock formations are listed in the National Register of Historic Places and in the Nebraska Natural Areas Register. Darton, N.H. 1903. A significant 19th century landmark for American pioneers, nearby the present day Dismal River archeological site is located on the northwest side of the rocks. Nearby passed the Oregon-California Trail, the Mormon Trail, the Pony Express Trail and the Sidney-Deadwood Trail. Rural Nebraska 88, Bridgeport, Morrill County, Nebraska, View this marker's location 41.600513, -103.0994, View a map of all Nebraska historical markers, Browse Historical Marker Map. It is the first of the three famous landmarks seen by westward migrants in the Nebraska Panhandle region, followed by Chimney Rock and Scotts Bluff. The Oregon-California Trail, the Mormon Trail, the Pony Express Trail and the Sidney-Deadwood Trail all ran near the rocks. . The scenic 200 yard, par 3, 5th hole follows the long duo. For a brief moment in American history Jail Rock and companion Courthouse Rock appeared in hundreds of pioneer journals during the mid 19th century. Area Map, Copyright © 2020 Benjamin Prepelka    All Rights Reserved. This page has been accessed 10,468 times. Nebraska Historical Marker: Courthouse and Jail Rocks, http://www.e-nebraskahistory.org/index.php?title=Nebraska_Historical_Marker:_Courthouse_and_Jail_Rocks&oldid=10545. While Court House Rock and Jail Rock are usually grouped together as one monument, the pioneers rarely mentioned Jail Rock, focusing on Court House Rock instead. The Great Platte River Road: The Covered Wagon Mainline via Fort Kearny To Fort Laramie. Often called a "castle" or "solitary tower," the name Courthouse was first used in 1837. Holes 3 and 4 lie side by side and total 1045 yards. Hundreds of westward-bound emigrants mentioned Courthouse Rock (originally also McFarlan's Castle) in their travel logs and journals. Courthouse and Jail Rocks, rising some 400 feet above the North Platte Valley, are erosional remnants composed of clay, sandstone, and volcanic ash. Further to the southeast on Pumpkin Creek, is the site of a Pony Express Station.