In the French sentence Nous parlons à nos parents (We talk to our parents), the preposition à (to) stands in the path of the verb object. (transitive, archaic) to know (sexually) (takes a reflexive pronoun) to be knowledgeable (en about) C'est toi qui t'y connais! For example. Je connais les lois du milieu, et, si je ne suis pas content, je le garderai pour moi. Rude or colloquial translations are usually marked in red or orange. Translate text from any application or website in just one click. Que replaces the direct object in a relative clause, whether it’s a person or a thing.For example, Le médecin fait des visites à domicile, et je le connais. If you love it, please consider making a one-time or monthly donation. 1866-11-17 in Paris: Opéra-Comique First Pub lication. Je le connais parfaitement. I've got a lot of studying to do, and, well, I mean. Il connaît son faible. E x a m ple: Est-ce que vous savez faire des crêpes? Results: 14880. Hélas! Note: Usually when the verb connaître or savoir is used in a question, you can reply with the same verb. Results: 81041. Ex: I know France = Je connais la France. Faire connaître son opinion. A1 | A2 | B1 | B2 | C1    Find your level. Pronoms relatifs. Here's what it means. This free website is created with love and a great deal of work. Elapsed time: 209 ms. Word index: 1-300, 301-600, 601-900, More, Expression index: 1-400, 401-800, 801-1200, More, Phrase index: 1-400, 401-800, 801-1200, More. Find more French words at wordhippo.com! These examples may contain rude words based on your search. © 2013-2020 Reverso Technologies Inc. All rights reserved. They are not selected or validated by us and can contain inappropriate terms or ideas. For example. Que = direct object. Que replaces the direct object in a relative clause, whether it’s a person or a thing. © 2013-2020 Reverso Technologies Inc. All rights reserved. The doctor (whom) I know does house calls. © 2020 Lawless French. Je ne sais pas is a very easy phrase to remember. Using two short, related sentences like this is stilted, so we combine them into one: Here’s another look at the very first example – you can word it another way to replace the subject rather than the object: The subject of the second sentence is le livre, so when combining the two sentences into one, it becomes qui. When used as relative pronouns, qui doesn’t necessarily mean "who" and que doesn’t always mean "that"; depending on the context, either one can mean either one.*. ― You're the expert! The fact that we’ve inverted the subject and verb does not change the grammatical function of the relative pronoun. Since it’s a direct object in both sentences, we can join them and replace the second maison with que, and there are two different ways to do this: In summary, que serves as a direct object in order to connect two clauses and avoid repetition. These examples may contain colloquial words based on your search. Translations in context of "connais" in French-English from Reverso Context: connais bien, connais rien, j'en connais, connais-tu, m'y connais Le monde connu des Anciens. Qui, on the other hand, replaces the subject of the subordinate clause, whether it’s a person or a thing. *** Also, it’s rarely just a verb – it’s often a noun or pronoun plus a verb, so already the "any other part of speech" part of the rule falls flat. Je connais ce pays-là. It sounds silly to say maison twice, right? Je ne lui connais point de défauts. Que ne puis-je te suivre Vers ce rivage heureux d'où le sort m'exila! I saw the house (that) he’s going to buy. Le pays des fruits d'or et des roses vermeilles, Où la brise est plus douce et l'oiseau plus léger, Où dans toute saison butinent les abeilles, Où rayonne et sourit, comme un bienfait de Dieu, Un éternel printemps sous un ciel toujours bleu! Translations in context of "tu connais" in French-English from Reverso Context: tu ne connais, tu me connais, tu le connais, connais-tu, tu la connais Connaître le bien et le mal. These examples may contain colloquial words based on your search. Examples are used only to help you translate the word or expression searched in various contexts. The friend whose house I ate at is a chef. It’s direct object agreement. Qui has another function as a relative pronoun: it replaces the indirect object after a preposition. Sorry, your blog cannot share posts by email. J’ai vu la maison. I know geography = Je connais la géographie. Je ne connais rien de plus vil qu'une telle conduite. = … Exact: 14880. Il va acheter une maison. ), * Unlike when they are interrogative pronouns, in which case qui means "who" and que means "what.". French grammar has six indirect object pronouns, plus two more when you count the forms with an apostrophe. Je connais bien un tel. All rights reserved. They are not selected or validated by us and can contain inappropriate terms or ideas. To replace those types of objects, you now need the indirect object pronoun, or IOP. Think you’ve got it? One of the things I really like is the theater. When used as relative pronouns, qui doesn’t necessarily mean "who" and que doesn’t always mean "that"; depending on the context, either one can mean either one.*. Test yourself on French relative pronouns with these fill-in-the-blanks exercises: Note: You must be logged into your Progress with Lawless French account to take these tests. Your support is entirely optional but tremendously appreciated. Please report examples to be edited or not to be displayed. If you don’t have one, sign up – it’s free! Don’t forget the rules of savoir however. By Veronique Mazet . The above sentence with two independent clauses is perfectly grammatical, but there’s another way to say it: combine them into a main and relative clause. He’s going to buy the house (that) I saw. Alternatively, J’ai pris un pot avec un collègue qui a été viré le lendemain.